February 10, 2015

Pipella Law Leads $1.2 Million Suit

U of C

Pipella Law is representing a former Canadian Olympic speed skater. Brianne Tutt had previously skated in the 1,500-metre race at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, where she finished 35th. Now she is seeking $1.2 million in “personal injury, damages and loss” from being struck from behind by another speed skater at the Olympic Oval two years ago. Tutt says she sustained severe permanent injuries, including a skull fracture, severe brain injury and fractured cervical vertebrae.

Tutt lost her Olympic dream as a result of the crash. She was unable to compete and was removed as a member of the World Cup speed skating team. Tutt also lost her national team status which resulted in loss of funding and benefits and was required to miss the 2013 World Cup winter circuit.

Tara Pipella, the plaintiff’s lawyer, filed a statement of claim at Court of Queen’s Bench stating “Christopher Morrison was skating with his head down and suddenly, without warning, slammed into her back on the morning of Dec. 15, 2012.” Tutt said in her claim that Morrison, “failed to follow the rules of the sport.”

An article reproduced in the Ottawa Citizen listed the named defendants. The parties allegedly responsible apart from the speed skater, Morrison, are his “coach Andrew Godbout, Speed Skating Canada, Alberta Amateur Speed Skating Association, Calgary Speed Skating Association, governors of the University of Calgary and other unnamed defendants.”

The statement reads,“[the collision] was with such force that the said plaintiff was flipped over into the air and slammed violently to the ground, forcefully hitting her head, face, neck, back, rib cage, left arm and left hand on the ice, thereby causing serious permanent injuries, damages and loss.”
Furthermore, the lawsuit argues, “the said collision was caused solely due to the negligence of the defendants.”

If you have suffered a personal injury, contact the personal injury lawyers at Pipella Law today to learn how they can help you recover from your traumatic experience.